Posts tagged ‘Jason Bradley’

Uh Oh, We’ve Got MADO


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What has ten parts, covers Minnesota, and ruins everybody’s fun? Give up? It’s MADO! What is MADO, you ask? It’s the Minnesota Association of Development Organizations! Now I know you’re all excited. You heard about the Northwest Regional Development Commission (NWRDC) in my last blog post. Well, that’s only one of ten regional planning organizations in this group. You can’t run, and you can’t hide. This organization covers all of Minnesota, except for a narrow strip from about St. Cloud to the southeastern corner of the state. A big chunk of that area is Met Council territory. You heard me right; the Met Council isn’t even included in these ten regional planning organizations.

Other than the aforementioned NWRDC, there are nine other groups, that combined, control the majority of Minnesota’s landscape. Just to the east of the NWRDC is the Headwaters Regional Development Commission (HRDC) based out of Bemidji, and then the Arrowhead Regional Development Commission (ARDC) is to the east of that, based out of Duluth. To the south of the NWRDC is the West Central Initiative (WCI) out of Fergus Falls. To the east of the WCI is the Region Five Development Commission (R5DC) based out of Staples, and to the east of that is the East Central Development Commission (ECRDC) based out of Mora. South of the WCI is the Upper Minnesota Valley Regional Development Commission (UMVRDC) based out of Appleton, and to the east of that is the Mid-Minnesots Development Commission (MMDC) based out of Willmar. South of the UMVRDC is the Southwest Regional Development Commission (SRDC) based out of Slayton, and lastly, to the east is the Region Nine Develpment Commission (R9DC) based out of Mankato. Is your head swimming? Good, because it should be! In fact, the map looks like this:

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So, ten regional planning organizations all under one umbrella, being centrally planned. What can go wrong? I hope to look into and explore each of these organizations in the future, but first, let’s look into MADO. What is it? What does it do?

MADO’s purpose is to create economic development in greater Minnesota. It is a network of Regional Development Organizations (RDO’s), state and federal agencies, and communities. The various RDO’s are governed by a board of directors of elected officials and special interest groups. RDO’s were authorized by the Minnesota Legislature in 1969 (thanks, guys), and are designated by the United States Department of Commerce. There are federal funds in the form of grants at the very least. Some of the services they provide are: community development, comprehensive planning, grant writing, transportation planning, housing planning, emergency planning, and environmental planning.

MADO has constructed the Develop MN 2016 Plan (Comprehensive Development Strategy for Greater Minnesota). We will  tear this plan apart in another blog article, but here’s what you need to know right now. MADO put this plan together to align greater MN under four priorities: Human Capital, Economic Competitiveness, Community Resources, and Foundational Assets. These are all designed to foster shared prosperity among the communities of greater Minnesota. They also talk about the need to have a strong and credible, collective voice. Collective? Shared? Those aren’t accidental words, and most hard-working folks in greater Minnesota would never anticipate their true origin. This is, however, all about an equalizing economic agenda. My friends, regional planning has run amok in Minnesota. It matters not where you go. You can not escape it. We will have more on this. You can be sure of that.

 

Jason Bradley is an entrepreneur in the music industry (Jason Bradley Live and Paper Lanterns Intl) and owns a consulting/advocacy/education firm that specializes in non-partisan politics (Community Solutions MN). Jason Bradley helps others to reach their goals in music and reduce the size and influence of government.

Connect with Jason on Google+

Jason on Google+

March 19, 2017 at 9:26 pm Leave a comment

Community Solutions MN Radio Podcast Why We Do What We Do


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In this new installment of the Community Solutions MN Radio Podcast, we discuss why we do what we do. We talk a little bit about what got us started, but we’ve told that story so many times. No, this is more about why it is so important to focus on local politics, despite the lack of attention it seems to get. We explain how our background gives a distinct advantage to anyone looking to get involved at this level of government. So take a listen, consider our ideas, and get in the game!

March 13, 2017 at 6:32 pm Leave a comment

Community Solutions MN Radio Podcast Comprehensive Plans


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2017 marks that time when all City Governments in the MN Metro need to review and rewrite their comprehensive plans. Andrew and Jason discuss all things comprehensive plans in this new installment of the Community Solutions MN Radio Podcast. What are they? What do they do? What aspects do they cover? What standards must be met? Answers to all these questions and more(like why you need to care and how to make your voice heard) exist in this episode. Watch it below:

February 24, 2017 at 12:07 pm 1 comment

Introducing The Northwest Regional Development Commission


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For quite a while now, we have discussed the ills of regional planning as implemented by the Metropolitan Council. They issue faulty population projections, force light rail and Transit Oriented Development (TOD) on communities, and require one-size-fits-all comprehensive plans from Cities, under threat of discipline. Is the Met Council alone in their actions? Are there other regional planning groups in Minnesota that do the same type of work? Let’s explore… introducing the Northwest Regional Development Commission.

The commission was created in 1973 by local government units under the authorization of the Regional Development Act of 1969 . Like the Met Council, it is an unelected body with levy power to collect property taxes. It includes the counties of Kittson, Marshall, Norman, Pennington, Polk, Red Lake, and Roseau. It stretches all the way from the Northwest corner of the state, westward to the west shore of Lake of the Woods at Roseau, and southward to Perley. The commission has 35 representatives (Counties, Cities, Townships, School Districts, and special interest groups). These members set policy and direction for the commission. Monthly business is handled by an appointed board of directors (one member from each county and an at-large Chairperson).

What kinds of business does this group handle? Are they really some shadow government group that meets in a smoky back room to control an entire region of Minnesota? Well… no, not really. They do it right out in the open. They tackle aging, arts, economic development, emergency operations planning, business loans, community development, and transportation planning. Why we need a regional planning commission to tackle these issues in a part of the state that is so spread out, I’ll never know.

Let’s take a look at their community development program. They offer a number of services, including tourism promotion, GIS mapping for recreation promotion, art and culture promotion, grant writing, comprehensive planning, zoning and mapping for local government, disaster mitigation and recovery, regional planning and project management, and housing. There are five housing subgroups that deal with affordable housing (Inter-County Community Council, Northwest Community Action Agency, Tri-Valley Opportunity Council, Multi-County Housing and Redevelopment Authority, and Northwest Regional Development Commission).

Transportation planning includes highway corridor studies, rail planning, port of entry issues, aeronautics planning, transit planning, scenic byways, regional road prioritizations, trails, and enhancements. The Commission handles transportation planning for Areawide Transportation Partnership (ATP) 2. They meet annually to develop and review a three-year Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP).

As you can see, there are many of the same facets to this regional planning body as to the Met Council: affordable housing, comprehensive planning, and transit. Now, does the NWRDC have the same iron-fist policy as the Met Council? How autonomous are the cities in this region? Those are questions that we’ll only begin to learn the answers to as we begin to review the comprehensive plans of the cities in that area. So stay tuned as we begin to uncover some of these hidden layers of government.

 

 

Jason Bradley is an entrepreneur in the music industry (Jason Bradley Live and Paper Lanterns Intl) and owns a consulting/advocacy/education firm that specializes in non-partisan politics (Community Solutions MN). Jason Bradley helps others to reach their goals in music and reduce the size and influence of government.

Connect with Jason on Google+

Jason on Google+

February 21, 2017 at 3:30 am Leave a comment

Dropping by the Up and At ‘Em Show


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Jason and Andrew dropped by the Up and at ‘Em Show to talk to Jack and Ben. Talk quickly turned to comprehensive plans and city ordinances. We then sat in for the News Bag and a great conversation with Senator Dan Hall. Listen here: Up and at ‘Em podcast.

February 4, 2017 at 2:21 pm Leave a comment

It’s Comprehensive Plan Time Again


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by Jason Bradley

Well, if you’ve been hanging around us for any length of time at all, you know that we are a little critical of the procedure for creating and approving comprehensive plans in metropolitan Minnesota. I probably haven’t given my full viewpoint enough publicity, but believe it or not, I’m not against comprehensive plans in theory. I am a planner. I believe that without a well-formulated plan, you have no idea where you are going. If you have no idea where you are headed, you will end up somewhere you don’t want to be. A detailed comprehensive plan can define and preserve the character of your community. It can help your city to run smoothly and prepare for emergencies.

That’s not what we’re talking about here. In the metro area, the Metropolitan Council creates a massive regional planning document that includes land use, housing, transportation, water, and parks. The latest Met Council concoction of faulty forecasting and trendy buzzwords has been dubbed “Thrive MSP 2040”. It boasts “One Vision, One Metropolitan Region”. Sounds warm and cozy, doesn’t it? All of the aspects of the plan must reflect the five outcomes: Stewardship, Prosperity, Equity, Livability, and Sustainability. We will get into more of the details of this plan in future blogs. Today, however, I just want you to understand that it exists. It exists, and drives all of the decisions made in your community.

The Met Council has the authority to force Cities to write and submit a new comprehensive plan every ten years. The city must write its comp plan in conjunction with the standards outlined in the regional plan. If it does not, the Met Council can ask them to go back to the drawing board and resubmit. The Met Council can continue to do this as it sees fit, impose fines, or exact other heavy-handed measures. The ability of a City to actually do what is in their best interest has been greatly limited.

So no matter if you live in Minneapolis, Minnetonka, or Marine on St. Croix, your city is slotted for increased rental units (including affordable housing), transit accessibility, an interconnected park system, mixed use development, reduced lot sizes of new developments, and other regional planning darlings to fit their consistently poor population forecasts, no matter if it fits into the character of your city or not.

So, what can we do? Ideally, a wave of Thrive MSP 2040 opponents would have been elected to city councils back in November. I’m not certain that happened. These comp plans will be written this year, and completed in 2018. Some elections will happen this year, so get on that, you cities that have odd year elections! In every city, we need to fill every open seat on every planning commission. All anyone (and I mean anyone can do this) needs to do is to go down to city hall and fill out an application. You go interview in front of the council, and they pick the best one (don’t say anything too crazy).  The planning commission advises the city council on the comp plan. That’s why it is important to get those spots. A single city has little hope of standing up to the Met Council, but a group of them standing together has a much better chance.

So, there you go. It may not be an election year for most of us, but there is still something worthy to fight for. Let us know how we can help you.

 

Jason Bradley is an entrepreneur in the music industry (Jason Bradley Live and Paper Lanterns Intl) and owns a consulting/advocacy/education firm that specializes in non-partisan politics (Community Solutions MN). Jason Bradley helps others to reach their goals in music and reduce the size and influence of government.

Connect with Jason on Google+

Jason on Google+

February 2, 2017 at 1:46 am Leave a comment

Community Solutions MN Radio Podcast- President Trump: Are All Politics Local?


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On our latest podcast, we thought that we’d discuss something a little different. We took a look at President Trump’s election, and how his policies might affect national and local governing. We talk about how the decisions made at the federal level can put pressure on local governments to accept federal dollars that aren’t necessarily in their best interest. We hope you enjoy it!

January 30, 2017 at 9:46 pm 1 comment

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